Otim Alpha
Gulu City Anthems
Nyege Nyege Tapes
/
2018
2LP
24.39
NNT003
Incl. VAT plus shipping / Orders from outside the EU are exempt from VAT
Tracklist
1Gang Ber Ki Dako 6:31
2Anyomo Laber (Pailyec)6:08
3Bilaber Cwerocwinya 6:08
4Lok Lobo Cwero Cwinya 6:02
5Too Wiye Ming-Alphazo 6:28
6Toni G 6:38
7Wilobo Lanyi 6:05
8Coo Oromo 5:03
9Cam Ki Lawoti II 5:54
10Agiki Ne Tye 5:06
11Kodi Pa Barikiya (Kwan)6:28

None-more-vital East African label Nyege Nyege Tapes present Otim Alpha’s melodic electro Acholi bangers on vinyl for the 1st time, following suit with their blazing, acclaimed Sounds of Sisso compilation resplendent in a faithful new remaster by Matt Colton.

Alpha’s debut international release Gulu City Anthems features 11 songs written and recorded between 2004 and 2015 in Northern Uganda and ranges from hi-velocity bangers to more romantic mid-tempo swagger, all serving a totally infectious showcase of his plugged-in take on traditional Larakaraka wedding music that’s bound to get a lot of listeners itching for a +1 invite to one of his ceremonial sessions (crashing is always an option, too!).

Working with producer Leo Palayeng, Otim essentially computerised Acholi wedding music, weaving its traditional, see-sawing folk fiddles and call-and-response vocals with stripped, pounding drum machine polyrhythms in a sort of hypnotic, minimalist delirium. For the most part, it’s properly uptempo, with some searing highlights in the likes of his wickedly off-kilter jig Kodi Pa Barikiya (Kwan), the jabbing clash of almost cajun-style rapidfire riffs and turbo-charged toms in Toni G, or the Detroit/Chicago ghetto-compatible bang of Too Wiye Ming-Alphazo. But there’s also one super-charming piece called Agiki Ne Tye which works at a relatively leisurely 120bpm with strolling bass and bright, joyful chord cadence, presumably intended to allow the party a sweet breather.

Following Alpha’s recent, stellar introductory live show at Unsound ’17, this collection is set to impress his sound to eager ears beyond Uganda and the East African scene, and is surely destined to be lodged in record collections somewhere between your Shangaan Electro, Konono No.1 and Caribbean soca faves