Toshimaru Nakamura
Culvert No-Input Mixing Board #10
Room40
/
2021
CD
16.99
RM4179
Incl. insert card
Incl. VAT plus shipping / Orders from outside the EU are exempt from VAT
Tracklist
1Toshimaru Nakamura - Culvert - No-Input Mixing Board 10 - 01 NIMB #63 5:24
2Toshimaru Nakamura - Culvert - No-Input Mixing Board 10 - 02 NIMB #64 1:51
3Toshimaru Nakamura - Culvert - No-Input Mixing Board 10 - 03 NIMB #65 5:21
4Toshimaru Nakamura - Culvert - No-Input Mixing Board 10 - 04 NIMB #66 2:00
5Toshimaru Nakamura - Culvert - No-Input Mixing Board 10 - 05 NIMB #67 3:53
6Toshimaru Nakamura - Culvert - No-Input Mixing Board 10 - 06 NIMB #68 5:07
7Toshimaru Nakamura - Culvert - No-Input Mixing Board 10 - 07 NIMB #69 8:16
8Toshimaru Nakamura - Culvert - No-Input Mixing Board 10 - 08 NIMB #70 9:08

Toshimaru Nakamura’s No Input Mixing Board instrument is without question one of the most personal and experimental explorations of its kind. Over 10 volumes, Nakamura has stretched the capacities of the mixing console in ways that both shock and delight. He maintains a tireless sense of curiosity, seeking to constantly expand the range of the instrument and subvert its pre- conceived role.

On Culvert NIMB#10, Nakamura’s work takes on an incredibly dynamic and at times volcanic quality. Each piece, moves between passages of deep rhythm and pulse which give way to caustic swaths of feedback, noise and at times a deep sense of harmony. The compositions are mini- malist in their form, but remain unconstrained, often veering into unexpected moments of deep quiet or explosive post-techno like grinds.

Culvert, the 10th volume in the No Input Mixing Board instrument series, expands the languages and approaches outlined on his previous effort, the 9th volume, which was released by Room40 in 2018. It is a testament to Nakamura’s skills as a producer, but moreover a recognition of his incredible craft and aesthetic sensibilities when it comes to creating something profound from literally nothing at all.

From Toshimaru Nakamura There used to be several small streams in west Tokyo, where I live. Some of them were natural rivers flowing from springs in this area. Others were from further west. Towards the east, down to the sea of Tokyo Bay, there are others which were man-made, created to distribute water. Now, most of these rivers are covered by concrete lids and many parts of them are converted into pathways with nicely lined-up trees and benches. Some stretches of these rivers even have an artificial brooks on top of the lids to recreate the landscape of the old days. Sort of a “double decker river”. Sitting on one of those benches, I think of the water flowing below, in the dark.