Regis
Necklace of Bites
Downwards
/
2019
2LP
23.39
DWN03
Ltd. to 500 copies, clear vinyl
Incl. VAT plus shipping / Orders from outside the EU are exempt from VAT
Tracklist
1Solution (Voices)1:15
2Wound Us 5:06
3Solution (Music)1:29
4Executive Handshake 4:41
5Adolescence 5:08
6Execution Ground 4:29
7Rites 4:56
8Purification (Endless)4:57
9Rise 1:18
10Baptism 6:08
11The Right Side Of Reason 5:01
12On The Wheel 1:36

Newly remastered at D&M, ’Necklace Of Bites’ is a vital volley of early Regis artillery sourced from 12”s issued by Downwards c. 1998-2000. Effectively a reshuffle of his 2000AD self-titled CD compilation of 12”-only cuts, it features his Jim Jones-sampling ‘Solution (Voice)’ amid a ruck of prime, dark and killer late ‘90s techno girders

Revolving definitively monotone and snaky templates for the Birmingham techno sound forged by Regis (alongside Surgeon, Female, Mick Harris and Justin Broadrick), ‘Necklace Of Bites’ is built in the driving, distorted and highly utilitarian style that spilled out of Brum’s Q Club in the mid ’90s, and which continues to infect the sets of DJs such as Helena Hauff and Blawan well into 2019.

Back before main room techno became meme-ified as “business techno”, these tracks were the Black Country shirehorses of peak time DJ slots across the UK, EU and the world. Influenced as much by Jeff Mills’ Axis and Purpose Maker 12”s and hardass Chicago house as original ‘80s industrial and post-punk, the dozen tracks epitomise Regis’ signature distillation of proper, bluecollar club sounds made for those who like to play hard and all night, and as such they’re future-proofed for use over 20 years later.

The set in particular highlights Regis’ hypnotically sexy and arguably rare use of vocal sampling in the inexorable, militant charges of ‘Execution Ground’, ‘Baptism’, and ‘Purification (Endless)’, while his use of a muffled Jim Jones sample on ’Solution (Voices)’ predates his use of Jones in BMB by half a decade. More to the point, the compilation also holds precious DJ tool bruisers in the likes of his lip-bitingly infectious roller ‘Wound Us’, and the industrial galvanics of ‘Adolescence’ and ‘Rites’ that still kill in the modern day.